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NUMERACY RESOURCES

Fluency Without Fear -

Number sense is one of the most important areas of mathematics – but we often encourage the opposite – the blind memorisation of maths facts. In this short paper Jo Boaler summarises some research evidence on the best ways for students to learn maths facts, also sharing some great activities to use in classrooms.

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Bounce: The myth of talent and the power of practice -

Three times Commonwealth table-tennis champion Matthew Syed explores the claim that talent is a myth and excellence is primarily down to sustained ‘purposeful practice’.

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Engineering and Technology: Skills & Demand in Industry (2014) -

The IET carries out annual surveys of businesses to gauge the state of skills in the engineering and technology sector. The results are published in the ninth annual IET Skills and Demand in Industry report.

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National Numeracy Firm Foundations for All Research 2013-14 -

As part of our Paul Hamlyn Foundation funded Firm Foundations for All project, National Numeracy conducted extensive desk and field research. This included travelling to a variety of locations in the UK to run focus groups with adult learners. Below is a summary of the full report.

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National Numeracy Parental Engagement Research 2013-14 -

As part of our Paul Hamlyn Foundation funded Parental Engagement project, National Numeracy conducted extensive desk and field research. We travelled to a variety of locations in the UK to run focus groups with parents and children, in order to better understand parental engagement in maths.

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Vision for science and mathematics education (2014) -

This report sets out the royal Society’s vision for science and mathematics education over the next 20 years.

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Mathematics after 16: the state of play, challenges and ways ahead (2014) -

This report from the Nuffield Foundation warns that plans to make GCSE Maths more demanding, detach AS from A levels, and replace the modular structure in favour of terminal exams could actually discourage students from continuing to study maths beyond the age of 16.

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